Coffee on Point https://www.coffeeonpoint.com Tue, 19 May 2020 10:53:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 What Is French Roast Coffee https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-french-roast-coffee/ Tue, 19 May 2020 10:48:11 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1259 As its name so aptly suggests, French roast coffee is a coffee roast that was popular in France first before it was adopted by the rest of the world. It’s characterized by a dark color and is considered to be less acidic than lighter coffee roasts. For anyone interested in this type of coffee roast, […]

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As its name so aptly suggests, French roast coffee is a coffee roast that was popular in France first before it was adopted by the rest of the world. It’s characterized by a dark color and is considered to be less acidic than lighter coffee roasts. For anyone interested in this type of coffee roast, we’ve decided to do a deep dive into the subject, so everyone can learn about one of the most famous coffee roasts that currently exist. With that being said, let’s get started on our adventure.

What Is French Roast Coffee?

This type of coffee is coffee that’s been roasted almost as far as it could possibly be roasted. What we mean, is that French roasting is the second to the final step of roasting before the coffee beans become burnt and unusable. That’s why this coffee not only has a dark countenance but also has an oily texture to it. Through the roasting process, the coffee’s natural oils are raised to the surface, and this gives the coffee beans a dark brown shimmering surface.

Most other types of coffee roasts are only taken to just after the first crack of the beans. The first crack is when the steam is first released from the beans and they make a “cracking” sound. French roast coffee is taken past that point and is taken to the point where the coffee beans crack again. This second “crack” is when the coffee bean’s cellular walls begin to break down. This allows oil to rise to the beans’ surface and gives this roast its unique flavor.

What’s The Flavor Profile Of French Roast Coffee?

The next thing that we would like to talk about is the flavor profile of this coffee roast. Taking coffee beans to a French roast cancels out much of the nuances that result from the bean’s origin and type. What we mean is that this type of roasting is the great equalizer. It makes just about all coffee beans to achieve the same flavor.

The flavor of French roast coffee is smoky, intense, and bold. It’s less acidic than light roasts such as a cinnamon roast or half city roast coffees, or medium roasts such as American or breakfast roasts. However, it does have slightly higher acid levels than a quality Italian roast coffee.

Do French Roast Coffees Have More Caffeine?

One of the most frequently asked questions that we come across is whether French roast coffees have more caffeine than other types of coffee. And to that question, we have to give our reader’s a resounding no! That’s because the longer coffee beans are roasted the less caffeine they have in them. After all, caffeine isn’t stable during the roasting process. Therefore, if you’re looking for a coffee that has less caffeine than a traditional roast coffee but isn’t decaffeinated, then you might want to try a good French roast coffee.

What’s The Difference Between A French & Italian Roast?

Although many consumers like to lump French and Italian roast coffees together in the same category, they’re actually slightly different. The difference is that Italian roasts are cooked slightly longer than French roast coffee and are therefore slightly darker than French roast coffee.

How To Make Your Own French Roast Coffee?

Have you ever wondered if you could make French roast coffee at home? Well, if you have, then you might want to pay particular attention to this section. That’s because we’re going to give you—and all of our readers—the information they need to make a fine French roast coffee.

Step One: Use A Quality Coffee Roaster

The first step to making a fine French roast coffee is to choose the best coffee roaster possible. You will want to make sure to choose a roaster that allows you to have precise control over the temperature of the coffee beans. Although some people do use a skillet, stovetop popcorn maker, or a cookie sheet and their oven to roast coffee, we feel that the results aren’t as predictable as using a quality coffee bean roaster.

Step Two: Purchase Green Coffee Beans

The next step is to make sure that you purchase green coffee beans. Fortunately, there are plenty of vendors selling green coffee beans online, so it shouldn’t be all that difficult to procure some. Although the country of origin might matter for lighter roasted beans, when making French roast coffee, the variety of beans or the origin isn’t that important because just about all coffee beans are going to taste the same when French roasted.

Step Three: Ensure You Have Proper Ventilation

Roasting coffee beans produces a lot of smoke, and roasting coffee beans to a dark roast produces a whole lot of smoke, so be sure to make sure you have the proper amount of ventilation in your home. That means having the vent over your stove running and having several windows open. Yes, dark roasting beans produce that much smoke, so be sure to plan ahead before you begin roasting to avoid smoking yourself out of your own home.

Step Four: Watch The Beans Carefully

The beans are going to go through all of the stages of the roasting process from the actual yellowing of the beans and past the second crack. With the first audible snap of the second crack, the beans have entered the Full City Plus roast level. As the beans progress through the second crack, they pass through the Continental or Light French roast level. As the second crack begins to accelerate and the beans are approximately 474-degrees Fahrenheit, the beans have obtained a Full French roast. If the temperature of the beans is taken over the 474-degree temperature, then the beans reach Italian roast levels.

It’s important to watch the beans through this process carefully because coffee beans can go from a Light French roast to a Full Dark French roast in as little as 30-seconds, so if you’re not carefully watching them roast, then you can easily end up burning them.

A Roasting Temperature Chart

It can be difficult for people to understand how to achieve certain roast levels, so we thought that we’d include a table that will help all of our readers obtain the perfect roast level for their beans. As you can see on the following chart, a Full French roast is approximately 474-degrees Fahrenheit, while a Light French roast is only 465-degrees Fahrenheit.

  • The First Crack Starts 401-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • The First Crack Continues 415-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • City Roast: 426-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • The Second Crack Begins 435-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • City Plus Roast: 435-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Full City Roast: 446-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Full City Plus Roast: 454-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Vienna ( Or Light French) Roast: 465-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Full-French Roast: 474-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Italian Roast: 475 to 480-Degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Burnt: 481+ Degrees.

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What Is Cascara https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-cascara/ Tue, 19 May 2020 10:41:16 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1254 Something that has just begun to appear on people’s radar is something called cascara. Many people are asking what it is, where it comes from, and how it’s used. Fortunately, we have some of those answers and are willing to do a deep dive into the whole subject. So, if you’ve ever wondered what cascara […]

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Something that has just begun to appear on people’s radar is something called cascara. Many people are asking what it is, where it comes from, and how it’s used. Fortunately, we have some of those answers and are willing to do a deep dive into the whole subject. So, if you’ve ever wondered what cascara was, then stick around and we’ll provide you with all of the answers you need.

What Is Cascara?

Quite simply, cascara is what the skin of the coffee cherry is commonly called. Usually, this husk is sold as a waste product or turned back into the soil and used as a fertilizer. However, in some parts of the world, it’s used to make tasty drinks such as Qishr or Sultana. It’s a product that’s named after the Spanish word for “skin.”

What Cascara Isn’t?

When buying cascara, however, the consumer should be very cautious. That’s because there is a product known as Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus Purhiana) that is sold as a tea that used as a laxative. You sure don’t want to mix up these two products, and that’s for sure.

Making Cascara Tea

The next thing that we’d like to discuss in this article is how to make cascara tea. Anyone who has had cascara tea knows of its pleasantly fruity, and sometimes spicy, the flavor that makes for a mild tea with about a quarter of the caffeine that coffee has. Below are the instructions for making this wonderful tea using something that you might already have on hand—your French press.

Equipment Needed:

Ingredients Needed:

  • Hot Water (4-Cups)
  • Cascara (64-Grams)
  • Ice

Directions:

Step One: Heat Up The Water

In your favorite tea kettle, place 4-cups of water and place it on your stove’s burner. When it reaches a rolling boil, remove it from the heat and allow it to sit for 30-seconds. This will lower the temperature of the water from 212-degrees Fahrenheit to 200-degrees Fahrenheit—which is the perfect temperature for this brew.

Step Two: Load Up The French Press

While the water is heating, add 64-grams, or about 5 tablespoons of cascara to your French press.

Step Three: Add The Water & Steep

Once the water has reached the proper temperature, pour it into the French press. Give the mixture a gentle stir with your chopstick, and then allow it to steep for approximately 4 to 5-minutes.

Step Four: Press The Tea

After the four minutes have elapsed, give the mixture another stir with your chopstick. Place on the lid and then begin to slowly compress the plunger until it has reached the bottom of the canister. Be sure to move slowly and take your time.

Step Five: Serve And Enjoy

In a glass, place some ice and then pour your cascara tea over it. Any leftover cascara tea can be placed into a separate jar with a lid and stored in the fridge for up to 48-hours. If you desire, you can add syrups or sweeteners to this tea so that it better suits your tastes, but many people just drink it as it is.

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What Is White Coffee https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-white-coffee/ Tue, 19 May 2020 10:32:40 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1249 There appears to be quite a bit of confusion around the term white coffee. Some people seem to think that it’s coffee that has milk, cream, or other coffee additives added to it that make the coffee appear to be white. However, what those people are describing is either a Cafe Au Lait or a […]

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There appears to be quite a bit of confusion around the term white coffee. Some people seem to think that it’s coffee that has milk, cream, or other coffee additives added to it that make the coffee appear to be white. However, what those people are describing is either a Cafe Au Lait or a Flat White. Actual white coffee is something different altogether.

To dispel some of the confusion around white coffee, we’ve decided to address the subject matter directly. In this article, we’re going to delve into the actual definition of white coffee, where it originated, and what people can expect it to taste like. Since we’re big fans of white coffee, we hope that this article will help steer some of our readers towards this product.

What Is White Coffee?

The term white coffee doesn’t refer to how the coffee is served but refers to how the beans are roasted. White coffee is roasted at a lower temperature and for a shorter amount of time than even light roasted coffees. While light-to-dark roasted coffees are usually roasted at anywhere from 450 to 500-degrees Fahrenheit, white coffee is only brewed at 325-degrees Fahrenheit. The results are white looking coffee beans that are extremely hard and needs a specially made coffee grinder for it to be properly ground.

Because it is roasted at lower temperatures than other coffee roasts, it also tends to have higher caffeine content. This is because the longer the roasting time, the lower the amount of caffeine found in the coffee, so it stands to reason that white coffee grounds would have some of the highest caffeine amounts available.

The Origins Of White Coffee

Although it’s currently popular for coffee shops all over North America to make and serve white coffee, this coffee didn’t originate in the U.S. Instead, it was first made in the Middle East—in Yemen, to be precise. In that country, white coffee has been brewed for hundreds of years. It’s a coffee that’s roasted to a light yellow color at lower temperatures, ground up, brewed, and then mixed with a blend of spices called Hawaij.

What is Hawaij? It’s a blend of spices that might include ginger, clove, cinnamon, and cardamom if it’s a sweet Hawaij, or cumin, turmeric, black pepper, or cloves if it’s a savory Hawaij. Of course, there are different versions of white coffee available in not only different parts of Yemen, but also in different countries including the U.S., Indonesia, Malaysia, and Lebanon.

Is White Coffee Healthier Than Black Coffee?

One of the most frequent questions about white coffee (right after asking what it is) is if it has health benefits over black coffee. And this isn’t an easy question to answer. While white coffee does have more Chlorogenic Acid than black coffee, an antioxidant that scientists believe protects against inflammation and heart disease, we’re afraid that the science isn’t conclusive, yet.

In our opinion, even if this antioxidant is proven to have higher levels of this antioxidant, it’s probably not a large enough amount to make a difference. Therefore, if you try white coffee and find out that you don’t enjoy it, you shouldn’t feel like you have to drink it for its health benefits because its likely health benefits are probably minimal.

The Pros & Cons Of White Coffee

Let’s take a few moments to address some of the pros and cons of white coffee. Although we’re not trying to dissuade people from trying this type of coffee any more than we’re trying to persuade them to try it, we do think it’s a good idea if all of our readers understand what they’re getting before they buy their next bag of white coffee available.

Pros:

  • Has A Milder Taste Than Black Coffee
  • May Be Healthier Than White Coffee
  • They Have A Slightly Higher Caffeine Content

Cons:

  • They Are More Expensive Than Other Coffees
  • They Have To Be Commercially Ground
  • How To Make Traditional White Coffee

How To Make Traditional White Coffee

Okay, now that we all have a better idea of what white coffee is, we think it’s now time to talk about how it should be prepared. We think that we will begin with making a traditional white coffee as they make it in many parts of the Middle East first, and then we’ll talk about making an “Americanized” version of white coffee.

Step One: Assemble Your Ingredients

The first step to making a traditional white coffee is to assemble your ingredients and tools. Below are some of the things that are going to be needed for the process of making a traditional white coffee.

  • 4-Cup Moka Pot
  • 2.5-Tablespoons Of Ground White Coffee
  • Filtered Water
  • Hawaij Spice Mix

Step Two: Make The Coffee According To Moka Pot Instructions

Following your Moka pot instructions, make the white coffee as you would for any other types of coffee. Brewing white coffee is very similar to brewing black coffee, and when you’re done you should end up with a tan coffee that has a mild nutty flavor to it.

Step Three: Add Hawaij Spice Mix

Once you have your coffee brewed, you can add 1-teaspoon of the Hawaij spice mix. This spice mix can be easily purchased online, but if you want to make it yourself, we’ve included a recipe on how to make it below.

Recipe For Hawaij Spice Mix

Okay, here is the recipe for the Hawaij spice mix for those of you who want to make your own.

Ingredients:

  • 6-Tablespoons Black Peppercorns
  • 4-Tablespoons Cumin Seed
  • 2.5-Tablespoons Coriander Seeds
  • 1.5-Tablespoons Green Cardamom Pods
  • 3.5 Tablespoons Ground Turmeric
  • 1.5 Teaspoons Whole Cloves

Directions:

Place a frying pan on medium-low heat and then put all of the spices, except for the turmeric, in the frying pan. Fry them without oil until they’re warmed up and have begun to release their fragrance. Remove them from the heat and then place them into a bowl to cool. Once cool, grind all of the spices and then add the turmeric to it. Be sure to store in an airtight container in a cool dark place.

How To Make American White Coffee

Since we’ve covered traditional white coffee, we thought it would be a good idea to make an American version of this drink. Although there are tons of different types of white coffees made in the U.S., the following recipe is our favorite.

Ingredients:

  • A French Press Coffee Maker
  • A Shockproof Glass
  • 1-Cup Of Ice
  • 2-Tablespoons Of Ground White Coffee
  • 1-Tablespoons Of Hazelnut Syrup
  • 1-Tablespoon Of Hazelnut Creamer
  • 6-Ounces Of Water
  • 1-Pinch Of Hot Chocolate Powder

Directions:

Now that we’ve assembled everything we need to make the drink let’s start making it. As you’ll probably notice about an American white coffee, it’s not very complicated to make, and it tends to be sweeter than traditional Middle Eastern versions of the drink.

Step One: Brew Using Your French Press Coffee Maker

Following the directions of your French press coffee maker, make sure to make six ounces of white coffee. If you find the mixture to be too weak for your tastes you can always adjust it, but we always use 2-teaspoons of white coffee for every six ounces of water.

Step Two: Prepare The Glass

In your glass add your creamer, hazelnut syrup, and a pinch of hot-chocolate powder. When that’s done, be sure to add approximately 1-cup of ice to the glass.

Step Three: Pour The Coffee

When the coffee has been brewed and the glass has been prepared, it’s now time to gently pour the white coffee into the glass. When that’s done, give it a gentle stir with your coffee spoon. You can now enjoy this icy American white coffee.

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What Is A Cortado https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-a-cortado/ Tue, 19 May 2020 10:20:49 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1244 For people who are just beginning to learn how to make their specialty drinks, there’s bound to be a feeling of being overwhelmed. That’s because there are hundreds—if not thousands—of specialty drinks that a person can make in the comfort of their home. And many of those drinks are made differently depending on where they’re […]

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For people who are just beginning to learn how to make their specialty drinks, there’s bound to be a feeling of being overwhelmed. That’s because there are hundreds—if not thousands—of specialty drinks that a person can make in the comfort of their home. And many of those drinks are made differently depending on where they’re made in the world.

Take the cortado, for example. In the U.S., it’s simply an equal amount of espresso and steamed milk. However, in other parts of the world, this drink is often made quite differently. In Saudi Arabia, it’s just a cup of espresso with a small amount of steamed milk. In other countries, it’s simply a cup of black coffee served with a dash of hot or cold milk. So, to someone new to making their own coffee drinks, all of this can be quite confusing.

Fortunately, home coffee aficionados can take heart because we’re going to cut through some of the confusion.  That’s because we’re going to layout this drink in all of its splendor for all of our readers to enjoy. We’re going to help our readers understand just precisely what a cortado is and how they can make their own at home. If that sounds good, then read on and we’ll dose out a little information on this exciting and tasty drink.

What Exactly Is A Cortado?

The word cortado comes from the Spanish word “Cortar,” a word that means “to cut.” And that is precisely what a cortado is, at least in the strictest sense. It’s an espresso that’s cut with steamed milk. Cutting the espresso with steamed milk helps to increase the flavor of the coffee dramatically, and it does it while reducing the coffee’s acidity levels. This creates a smooth, flavorful drink anyone can enjoy.

Of course, there’s a wide variety of different drinks that use espresso as their base, and all of them have varying amounts of milk added to them. So, what differentiates a cortado from a flat white, or other espresso drink is the amount of milk that’s added to it. In our estimation, a cortado is a drink that falls somewhere in between a cappuccino and a short macchiato.

What’s The Difference Between A Flat White And A Cortado?

Our simple explanation of what constitutes a cortado might leave some people wondering what’s the difference between a flat white coffee and a cortado. After all, at first glance, they appear to be the same drink, but that’s not exactly true. There are subtle differences between these two drinks that differentiate one from the other. Let’s take a closer look at these differences.

The main difference between a flat white and a cortado is the type of milk used. For a flat white, the milk is textured and is also usually a lot hotter than the milk used in a cortado. In Spain, they don’t use textured milk in the cortado. In that sense, flat white coffee drinks are actually like small lattes, while a cortado is simply espresso with steamed milk.

How To Make A Cortado

Since the cortado is a specialty drink, you’re going to have to have a few tools available to you to properly make one. After all, this isn’t simply a coffee made with added milk. No, it’s an espresso, so you’re going to need an espresso machine, high-quality espresso grounds and a few other basic tools to begin. Let’s get started with what you’re going to need and then move on to actually making the drink.

Items Needed:

Step One: Grind Your Beans

The first step to any quality espresso is to finely grind your favorite espresso beans. It doesn’t matter what type of coffee beans you use, just make sure that you a quality burr coffee grinder to get an even consistency.

Step Two: Setup Your Espresso Machine

The next step is to set up your espresso machine. This includes measuring out the coffee grinds and tamping them. Be sure to add enough coffee to pull a double shot of espresso into your cup. Also, make sure that you have quality filtered water added to the machine too, and that the machine is warmed up and ready to go.

Step Three: Pull Two Shots Of Espresso

According to your machine’s instructions and common espresso-making practice, pull two shots of espresso into your cup. For best results, use a glass that’s already been warmed up, so the temperature of the coffee isn’t pulled down when the shot is pulled into the glass.

Step Four: Add Your Favorite Milk

Once the double-shot has been pulled, be sure to steam the milk of your choice. For a proper cortado, we like to use whole milk, but you can feel free to use any type of milk that you want including almond or oat milk, coconut milk, or soy milk. Make sure to add the espresso at a ratio of 1:1 (1-part espresso and 1-part milk).

What’s A Gibraltar?

A well-known variation on the cortado is a Gibraltar. This drink was coined by the Blue Bottle Coffee Company. It’s simply a cortado that’s placed into a 4.5-ounce Libbey Gibraltar glass. That’s all there is to it. It’s a double shot of espresso and two ounces of steamed milk placed into a Gibraltar glass. It’s super easy to make and we have to admit that the glass makes for a beautiful presentation of this drink. It’s a drink that some people may want to serve to their friends if they happened to have some Gibraltar glasses in the cupboards.

One Last Thing…

That’s all there is to making a great cortado. As can be seen from our instructions, making this drink isn’t all that complicated once you actually define your terms and differentiate a cortado from a flat white. We know that anyone who makes this drink at home is going to immediately love it, not only because it is a coffee drink that’s easy to make, but because it’s a smooth and flavorful one as well.

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What Is Ristretto https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-ristretto/ Tue, 19 May 2020 09:45:35 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1237 Anyone who has ever wandered into their local coffee shop and ordered a ristretto for the first time may have been alarmed by what they received. Okay, they may not be alarmed, per se, by what they received—but they most definitely might be confused by the amount of the coffee drink that the barista has […]

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Anyone who has ever wandered into their local coffee shop and ordered a ristretto for the first time may have been alarmed by what they received. Okay, they may not be alarmed, per se, by what they received—but they most definitely might be confused by the amount of the coffee drink that the barista has given them. That’s because this drink is a coffee that is served as a very short shot of espresso.

This might prompt some people to ask: “Why would I pay the same amount of money (or in some cases, more) for a short shot of espresso when I could order a regular size coffee shot?” We would probably answer that question by telling them that when they order a ristretto, they are ordering a high-quality and more potent version of an espresso. Therefore, they’re paying for quality instead of quantity.

We do understand that there’s a bit of confusion over this drink, and that’s why we’ve decided to write this article on the subject. First and foremost, the main purpose of this article is to explain to all of our readers what constitutes a ristretto. We want to give our readers a basic textbook definition of this drink. The second reason for this article is to explain to our readers how they can make the best ristretto at home. Now that we have some objectives clearly in mind, let’s get this article started and find out a little bit more about this short but potent drink.

What Is Ristretto?

Let’s start this guide by addressing its original question: What is a ristretto? Some of our readers may think that we’ve already addressed this question in the above section, but that’s not the case. That’s because there’s more to this drink than it being a ½ to ¾ ounce of espresso. There’s a lot more.

The ristretto is a short drink, but it’s an extremely powerful one. That’s because although less water is used to make the shot, the same amount of coffee grounds are still used. With less water being forced through the same amount of coffee grounds, the drink undergoes a shorter brewing time. And with shorter brewing times, there are some remarkable differences in the brew quality.

One of the main differences that set ristretto apart from ordinary espresso drinks, or other coffee drinks for that matter, is the fact that it achieves more of a full-bodied flavor. It has a better coffee taste, and it achieves this enhanced coffee taste without the bitterness that can be found in many coffee drinks. This makes it a smooth rich drink that many coffee aficionados are going to enjoy.

Oh, and for all of those of you who are wondering why this drink is called a ristretto, it’s because that’s the Italian word for “restricted.” A name that doesn’t delve into the minutia of this drink and doesn’t convey just how good this drink tastes. If you went by the name of this drink only, you would think you were being cheated, when in fact, nothing could be further from the truth. A true ristretto is a treat, and that’s why we’re going to take the time to tell you how you can make one at home in the next section of this article.

How To Make A Ristretto

As promised, we’re going to tell you and all of our other readers how they can make arguably one of the best coffee drinks available. If you’ve made espresso at home before, then you probably have all of the equipment you need to make a ristretto, but if you haven’t, then you may have to order some accessories. Let’s start this section off by talking about some of the equipment and ingredients you’re going to need to start brewing.

Equipment Needed:

Ingredients Needed:

  • Filtered Water
  • 14-grams Of Arabica Or Robusta Coffee Beans

Step One: Start With Great Coffee Beans

The first step to making the best ristretto possible is to start with high-quality coffee beans. Our two favorite varieties that we love to use for this coffee drink is a good Arabic bean or a good Robusta coffee bean. Arabica beans have a higher acid content and a fruity taste, while Robusta beans tend to have more caffeine and a nuttier taste. Choose the one that you like and give it a try. Oh, by the way, for best results, be sure to start with whole beans and grind them.

Step Two: Give Your Beans A Fine Grind

Using the best burr grinder available, make sure that you grind your beans finely. And when we say fine, we do mean fine. It should be finer than what you would normally grind for espresso. Why? It’s because the fine grind will help to give the end brew a smoother taste.

Step Three: Prime Your Espresso Machine

The next thing that you’re going to want to do is to primer your espresso machine. This can easily be done by allowing the water in the machine to fully heat up and then pulling a few “empty” shots with just water and no coffee. Although this step is optional, you may want to do it to “warm-up” vital components. After all, the ristretto brewing time is very short, so you want to make sure that the machine is warm and ready to go.

Step Four: Get The Espresso Machine Ready

The next step is to get the espresso machine ready. At this point, this means adding 14-grams of coffee grounds to the filter.  Once you’ve done that, tamp down the coffee in the filter the same way you would for an espresso. This will eliminate air spaces between the coffee grounds and result in a more even brew. After tamping, place the filter into the machine and get ready to brew.

Step Five: Brew Your Ristretto

According to your espresso machine’s direction, pull water through the coffee grounds for approximately 15-seconds. Congratulations, you have just pulled your first ristretto—a drink that we know you’re going to want to make again and again.

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How To Make Nitro Cold Brew https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/how-to-make-nitro-cold-brew/ Tue, 19 May 2020 09:34:47 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1232 There are a variety of different coffee brewing methods that seem mysterious to people who may not be familiar with them, and one brewing method that seems extremely is nitro cold brewing. Not only does the name seem to inspire a sense of true excitement in people, but the fact that it’s a method of […]

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There are a variety of different coffee brewing methods that seem mysterious to people who may not be familiar with them, and one brewing method that seems extremely is nitro cold brewing. Not only does the name seem to inspire a sense of true excitement in people, but the fact that it’s a method of boosting cold coffee with nitrogen seems like something that has come from the future.

This exciting and seemingly scientific way of making cold coffee doesn’t have to be mysterious any longer. Now, thanks to many of the great nitro-brew systems that are available, anyone can enjoy this drink in the comfort of their home. And we’re going to show just how easy it is to do it. So, for all of our readers who are ready to take a plunge into this exciting way of making coffee, we’ve presented a guide that we hope will help you do it.

How To Make Nitro Cold Brew

In our opinion, there are two different ways for consumers to make nitro cold brew coffee at home. They can either spend a good chunk of change to purchase all of the equipment they’re going to need for the process separately, or they can go online and buy a Nitro-Brew System.

What’s the difference? Well, the main difference is that buying all of the equipment separately can become very expensive, and there’s also a bit of a learning curve involved with the entire process. Home-brew kits, on the other hand, are only a fraction of that cost, and they’re easy to use, too. That’s why in this article, we’re going to be using a nitro cold brew system for making coffee. And we advise everyone to follow our lead.

Step One: Start With A Good Nitro Cold Brew System

There are plenty of nitro cold brew systems for consumers to buy online. Some models use a handheld nitrogen canister and a specially shaped dispenser, while others use either a mini-keg or a stand-up nitrogen cartridge. The one you choose is certainly up to you, but some of the systems that we like include ones by Royal Brew, Growler Werks, and HB Brewing nitrogen cold brew systems. Just be sure to choose the one that you’re confident in using.

Step Two: Make A Cold Brew Coffee

The next step to making a nitro cold-brew is to make the best cold brew coffee possible. There a quite a few different ways to brew this type of coffee, but if you don’t have a preferred cold-brew method of your own, we’ve included one at the end of this guide for your convenience. Even if you decided not to do a nitro cold-brew, you still might want to take a look at it because we think it’s a good way to make cold brew coffee and we’re quite proud of it.

Step Three: Flavor Your Coffee (Optional)

Okay, this step is completely optional, but some people may want to give it a try if they like a particular type of flavored cold brew. There are a variety of coffee syrups that consumers can add to their cold brew coffee to take it to the next level, so if that sort of thing sounds interesting to you, then feel free to add your favorite flavoring to your coffee in this step.

Step Four: Use Your Nitro-Brew System

We don’t know what type of nitro cold-brew coffee system you’re inevitably going to be using, so we can give you precise details on making your coffee with it, but we will say that you should follow all of the brewer’s manufacturer’s instructions. Most of these systems are as easy as adding the coffee to a dispenser, hooking up the nitrogen hose, and adding the gas to the coffee. Follow the directions provided with your system and you should have no problems whatsoever.

Step Five: Swirl & Serve!

The final step to this whole process is to swirl the kettle to make sure the coffee and the nitrogen gas come together evenly and then pouring the resulting brew into a glass. And with that being done, all that’s left is for you to pat yourself on the back and enjoy your nitro cold-brew coffee.

How To Make Cold Brew Coffee For Use In A Nitro-System

As we promised earlier, this is our recipe for making cold brew coffee—especially a cold brew that’s being used with a nitro-based system. We feel that it’s smooth, easy to drink, and complements most nitro-systems quite well.

Ingredients:

  • 2.5-Cups Of Coarse Ground Dark-Roast Coffee
  • 12-Cups Of Cold Water
  • A Large Container With A Lid
  • A Mesh Sleeve
  • An XL Mixing Bowl
  • A Cheesecloth
  • A Wooden Spoon

Directions:

Step One: Combine Ingredients

The first step is to place the coarse ground coffee in the large container and add the cold water. Using a wooden or plastic spoon, give the mixture a gentle mix and then cover it with the lid. Set this mixture in the fridge for at least 12-hours but no more than 24-hours.

Step Two: Strain The Mixture

Take the mixture out of the fridge, remove the lid, and pour the mixture through a mesh sleeve that has a double layer of cheesecloth strategically placed in it. If after the first filtering, the coffee still looks dark and cloudy, then you may want to filter it 1-2 more times to clean it up. The coffee is properly filtered when no more sediment remains in it.

Step Three: Add Some Cold Water

This is a fairly concentrated mix, so you may want to dilute it according to your taste. Usually, that involves mixing it at a ratio of 1:1 with ordinary cold water, but some people like to mix it with a ratio of 2-parts cold water to one part cold coffee concentrate. It’s ultimately up to you and your tastes how you want to mix it to achieve the taste you’re looking to achieve.

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What Is Nespresso https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/what-is-nespresso/ Tue, 19 May 2020 09:25:35 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1225 Nespresso is a way of making single-serve coffee drinks quickly and efficiently. It involves using a Nespresso machine that uses pods to brew coffee. Because the pods are small, easy to use, and come in an assortment of flavors, these machines allow the consumer to brew a variety of exciting coffee drinks. It’s a great […]

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Nespresso is a way of making single-serve coffee drinks quickly and efficiently. It involves using a Nespresso machine that uses pods to brew coffee. Because the pods are small, easy to use, and come in an assortment of flavors, these machines allow the consumer to brew a variety of exciting coffee drinks. It’s a great little system, but it’s not for everyone, so we decided to find out the pros and cons of the product, so all of our readers can determine if it’s right for them or not.

Who Makes Nespresso Machines?

Nespresso is a trademarked name owned by the Nestle Group, but the machines are manufactured by a wide range of different manufacturers. For example, there’s the De’Longhi Nespresso machine, the Innissia Espresso machine, and machines made by Philips. It’s more apt to say that Nespresso is a particular process and not just a type of machine. To see what we mean, let’s take a closer look at them.

How Do Nespresso Machines Work?

Nespresso machines are filled with water and then the person inserts a special coffee pod that’s manufactured to work with the Nespresso process. Some machines are capable of reading the barcode on the pod, which allows the machine to brew according to the pod’s instructions, and on other machines, the consumer has to set the machine themselves. Either way, the machine pierces the foil top of the capsule and then the brewing process begins.

The Different Types of Nespresso Capsules

At the time that we wrote this guide, Nespresso had 16 different varieties of coffee capsules for consumers to choose from. These 16-types of capsules can be broken down into Espressos, Pure Origin, Lungos, and Decaffeinato capsules. Let’s examine each one briefly to get a sense of what each of the capsules provides the coffee drinker.

Espresso Capsules

These are the designed to pull single shots of espresso, and as a result, are good for making short coffees. These capsules come in a variety of different flavors and strengths. There are seven different types of these capsules and they include the following espresso sub-types:

  • Ristretto
  • Arpeggio
  • Roma
  • Livanto
  • Capriccio
  • Volluto
  • Cosi

Pure Origin

These capsules can be traced to a single place of origin. There are three different Pure Origin types and these include the following capsules:

  • Indriya
  • Dulsano
  • Rosabaya

Lungos

Longos are basically double-shot espressos, or as some people may call them, a longer or taller coffee. These capsules come in three different types including the following:

  • Linizio Lungo
  • Vivalto Lungo
  • Fortissio Lungo

Decaffeinato

These capsules are designed to be 99.99% decaffeinated and to be available in a variety of different styles. Below are the main types of decaffeinato coffee available.

  • Decaffeinato Intenso
  • Decaffeinato
  • Decaffeinato Lungo

The above four types of Nespresso pods incorporate all of the flavors and roasts that are provided by this brand. These four categories represent both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee drinks and roasts that range from medium all the way to dark roast. And because this system is easy to use, just about anyone can enjoy a tasty Nespresso coffee.

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How Long Does It Take For Caffeine To Wear Off https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/how-long-does-it-take-for-caffeine-to-wear-off/ Tue, 19 May 2020 09:17:44 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1220 Although caffeine is commonly associated with coffee and tea products several foods do contain this naturally occurring chemical. In nature, this chemical is used by many plants as an insecticide to protect them against insects. Insects are so small, the same dose that we find as a natural pick-me-up is enough to kill them. In […]

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Although caffeine is commonly associated with coffee and tea products several foods do contain this naturally occurring chemical. In nature, this chemical is used by many plants as an insecticide to protect them against insects. Insects are so small, the same dose that we find as a natural pick-me-up is enough to kill them.

In humans, caffeine is a stimulate that improves mental alertness and has been recently shown to help speed up the effects of common painkillers such as acetaminophen or aspirin. Caffeine works by stimulating the central nervous system and can raise the blood pressure of people who don’t consume it regularly.

With that being said, caffeine is a relatively safe chemical compound—for most people—and some studies have shown that it may have benefits such as improving airway function for people with asthma and lowering the risk of type 2 diabetes for some people.

Of course, because caffeine is a chemical that is capable of increasing heart rate and blood pressure, people tend to wonder how long it takes for caffeine’s effects to wear off after consuming it. That was something we’ve been wondering too, so we decided to do a bit of research and find out how quickly the human body metabolizes caffeine, and how long it takes for this chemical compound to exit the body. With that being said, let’s seek out the answers to these questions and dig into the subject.

How Long Does It Take For Caffeine To Wear Off?

Okay, let’s just get right into it and deal with our central question of how long it takes for caffeine to exit the human body. And that’s a question that’s very easy to answer because caffeine exits the human body in a very reliable fashion. Caffeine has a half-life of approximately 5-hours, so if the consume takes in 190 milligrams of caffeine, which is about two 8-ounce cups of coffee, then 95-mg of it will remain in their body after 5-hours.

How Long Does It Take For Caffeine Levels To Peak In The Body?

Another question we’re frequently asked is how long it takes for caffeine to peak after ingesting it. For most people who drink coffee, tea, or any other caffeinated drink, they can expect caffeine levels to begin to peak within 15-minutes—longer if they’ve ingested food with the coffee.

How Much Caffeine Can Be Found in Common Foods & Drinks?

Since people need to know how much caffeine they’ve consumed in order to calculate the half-life of its effects, it’s probably a good idea to talk about how much caffeine can be found in some of the more common foods and drinks.

  • Coffee (8-Ounces) Drip Coffee: 95 Mg.
  • Espresso (1-Ounce): 64 Mg.
  • Brewed Tea (8-Ounces): 47 Mg.
  • Energy Drinks (16-Ounces): 158 Mg.
  • Caffeinated Soda (12-Ounces): 45 Mg.
  • Chocolate Candy Bar (1.55-Ounces): 9-10 Mg.

What’s A Safe Level Of Caffeine?

The last thing that we want to discuss before we end this article is what level of caffeine is safe. Although caffeine may not be safe for people who are especially sensitive to it—for most people, 400 mg of caffeine can be safely consumed per day. However, if in doubt, it’s always important for the consumer to check with their doctor to see what might be appropriate for them.

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Why Does Coffee Make Me Tired https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/why-does-coffee-make-me-tired/ Tue, 19 May 2020 08:22:20 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1138 A common complaint that some people experience when they drink coffee is a feeling of tiredness that seems to contradict the notion that coffee helps to keep a person awake. These people are often confused about why coffee would produce this effect. After all, caffeine is a known stimulate, and depending upon the coffee drank, […]

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A common complaint that some people experience when they drink coffee is a feeling of tiredness that seems to contradict the notion that coffee helps to keep a person awake. These people are often confused about why coffee would produce this effect. After all, caffeine is a known stimulate, and depending upon the coffee drank, contains approximately 95-milligrams of caffeine for every 8-ounces of coffee. We, too, were quite confused by this phenomenon, so we decided to investigate it further, and what we discovered was that there are some very good reasons why coffee might be making a person tired throughout the day.

Reason #1: Coffee Is A Diuretic

One of the first reasons why coffee may be making a person tired is because coffee is a slight diuretic. This means that it causes the person that dranks it to pass more urine than if they hadn’t ingested it in the first place. Anyone who drinks any amount of coffee knows that this is a fact, so it shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone. What is most likely a surprise, however, is that this might mean that the coffee is making the person drinking it slightly dehydrated—and it’s this dehydration that can cause tiredness.

The best way to counter the potentially dehydrating effects of coffee is to limit the amount of coffee drank throughout the day and to increase your water intake. In most cases, this small change in behavior can counter the sleepiness that can be caused by coffee’s slight dehydrating effect on the coffee drinker.

Reason #2: Coffee May Block Adenosine

Another common cause for “coffee tiredness” is because of the build-up of a little chemical called Adenosine. Normally, Adenosine is a chemical that the body uses to regulate the central nervous system. As a person goes throughout their day, Adenosine builds up and this build-up alerts the central nervous system that it’s time for bed. After a person goes to sleep, their Adenosine levels than begin to rise until it’s at a level that alerts the person’s brain it’s time to get up.

It’s this rise and fall of Adenosine that keeps a person’s sleep/wake cycle properly tuned. However, caffeine tends to disrupt that natural process a little bit by preventing Adenosine from binding to receptors in the brain. This chemical doesn’t go away, however. Instead, it continues to build-up. When the coffee drinker stops drinking coffee and their caffeine levels drop, then there’s nothing preventing Adenosine from binding to its normal receptors and they tend to do so all at once. This creates a feeling of sudden tiredness after the person has stopped drinking coffee.

A solution for preventing this from happening is to drink a decaffeinated coffee. Although decaffeinated coffee always has some caffeine in them, it’s generally small enough that it doesn’t prevent too much of a disruption to Adenosine receptors in the brain.

Reason #3: It Might Not Be The Coffee At All

The last reason that some people get tired after drinking coffee has nothing to do with the coffee itself but is more than likely what they add to that coffee. Sugar can produce a “crashing” effect that can make a person feel like they’re getting tired. A way of preventing that from happening is by switching to black coffee or moving to an artificial sweetener.

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How Is Decaf Coffee Made https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/how-is-decaf-coffee-made/ Tue, 19 May 2020 07:21:35 +0000 https://www.coffeeonpoint.com/?p=1133 To many people, decaf coffee is a mystery. Not only do they not know how much caffeine is found in decaffeinated coffee, but they also don’t know how decaf coffee is made. To clear all of this up, we’ve decided to explore this subject further. We’ve decided to not only talk about how decaffeinated coffee […]

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To many people, decaf coffee is a mystery. Not only do they not know how much caffeine is found in decaffeinated coffee, but they also don’t know how decaf coffee is made. To clear all of this up, we’ve decided to explore this subject further. We’ve decided to not only talk about how decaffeinated coffee is made but also its history and caffeine content as well. So, if that sounds like something that you might be interested in learning, then feel free to follow along with us as we explore the mysterious world of decaffeination.

What Is Decaffeination?

Decaffeination is the process of removing caffeine from not only coffee beans but any product that may include caffeine—including cocoa beans or tea leaves. Depending on the process used, decaffeination can leave as little as 1% or as much as 20% of the product’s original amount of caffeine.

The History Of Decaffeination

Believe it or not, the reason why people started decaffeinating coffee beans was due to a request from the German poet and statesman Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Although Goethe didn’t invent the process of removing caffeine from coffee beans, he did start Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge on the project. He did this after he had watched a presentation of Runge isolating and removing the poison found in the belladonna plant, and then using it to dilate a cat’s pupils. Goethe was so impressed with the result, he asked Runge to find out the ingredient in coffee beans that kept him awake at night. After a few months of work, Runge isolated the caffeine in coffee beans in 1920, and the rest is history as they say.

Although Runge managed to isolate caffeine in coffee beans so it could be identified, he didn’t attempt to pursue a commercial decaffeination process. That wouldn’t happen until a German merchant named Ludwig Roselius and a few of his co-workers invented the first commercially viable method of decaffeination in 1903. This process was called the Roselius Process and it processed steamed coffee beans with different bases and/or acids and then using benzene to remove the caffeine. Over the years, benzene was eventually replaced as a solvent for removing caffeine due to it being listed as a known carcinogen.

Nowadays, several different methods of decaffeination are used, and these include the Direct Method, the Indirect Method, the Supercritical CO2 Process, the Swiss Water Method, and probably the most popular method of all, the Swiss Water Process. Let’s take a look at these different decaffeination methods below, so we can get a better understanding of how these processes work.

The Different Ways Of Decaffeinating Coffee Beans

Okay, now we’re going to get to the heart of this guide: Finding out the different ways to decaffeinate coffee beans. Although we won’t go too deep into the technical details of each method, we can give all of our readers a basic overview of each process, so they can understand it better. If that sounds good to you, then let’s get started.

The Direct Method

Using this method, the manufacturer usually steams the green coffee beans for a preset period and then rinses them using either methylene chloride or ethyl acetate for up to 12-hours. When the solvent is removed, it takes the caffeine with it. The beans are then steamed again to ensure that any remaining solvents are thoroughly removed.

The Indirect Method

The second method of decaffeinating coffee beans is the Indirect Method. This method soaks the green coffee beans in near-boiling water for a few hours, and this removes the caffeine from the beans. Unfortunately, it also removes the essential oils and flavors from the beans, so additional steps are often required to reunite these flavors and oils with the beans.

After the water containing the caffeine, oils, and coffee flavors is separated into another tank, the water is then treated with methylene chloride to remove the caffeine. This prevents the solvent from coming into direct contact with the coffee beans. The water is then reunited with the beans where it can reabsorb the flavors and oils. The rest of the solvent is then vaporized during the roasting process.

The Supercritical CO2 Method

This method uses carbon dioxide under high temperature and pressure to remove caffeine from the coffee beans. The carbon dioxide enters the beans like a gas but dissolves the caffeine like a liquid. After the beans have been soaked in water for a while, which helps to expand cell structures and make caffeine removal easier, the coffee beans are then exposed to carbon dioxide for several hours. The carbon dioxide absorbs caffeine, liquefies, and then evaporates. As it does so, it takes the caffeine along with it.

The Swiss Water Method

The Swiss water method is another common way to decaffeinate coffee beans. Using the method, coffee beans are immersed in hot water, and that removes the caffeine and their flavor compounds from the beans. The beans are then discarded, and the green coffee extract is then passed through a carbon filter that removes the caffeine molecules. This extract is then used to wash and filter the next batch of beans. This allows the water extract to remove the caffeine without using chemical compounds, and without the beans losing their flavor compounds. This is why this method is most often used for decaffeinating organic green coffee beans.

The Final Word On Decaffeinated Coffee

Hopefully, all of the above information will prove useful to not only people who are interested in the science behind decaffeination but also for people who are looking to buy the best-decaffeinated coffee possible. We also hope that it will permit more people to purchase decaffeinated coffee products for their use. Although the decaf coffee of the past was pretty poor, the ones sold today are pretty tasty and are worth considering—especially if you have a sensitivity to caffeine. That’s probably why decaffeinated coffee accounts for approximately 12% of all worldwide coffee sales. If decaf coffee wasn’t good, more than 1 out of 10 people wouldn’t be enjoying it daily.

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